zea7:

topladsk8erboi:

kastiakbc:

veganvibez:

found the best twitter 

I was angry until i read the tweets

I wasn’t annoyed until I read the tweets. What a load of fucking bullshit

They’re pointing out what non-feminists sound like? Its actually kind of funny

(via whiskmeawayreilly)

we stop and we see a wolf on a distant hill, and it’s a really beautiful, beautiful scene. It’s like so heart-warming because it’s just a beautiful moment between these foxes and little animals and this really like mysterious wolf who we’ve heard about the entire movie and who doesn’t talk in this scene and he’s not wearing clothes. He’s kind of, he represents I guess, the wild. He’s a wild wolf and animal, and it’s a beautiful moment where they have this great connection, and in that moment, it really like to me the point of that scene is let’s keep on being free. Let’s keep on being animals. And it’s such an uplifting moment, and like when I’ve seen it with audiences, a bunch of people break into huge cheers and hooting. It’s such an awesome, awesome scene. It really just blows my mind. - Jason Schwartzman

(Source: hiddlestohn, via maggie-stiefvater)

thetidesinitsgrave:

wawaqueen:

Maybe I should do the Boo Radley Challenge where I stay in my house for 25 years and never leave

This is the greatest literary reference I’ve ever read.

(via literatebitch)

fernweh [feyrn-vey]

—(noun) This wonderful, untranslatable German word describes the feeling of homesickness for a far away land, a place you have never visited. Do not confuse this with the english word, wanderlust; Fernweh is much more profound, it is the feeling of an unsatisfied urge to escape and discover new places, almost a sort of sadness. You miss a place you have never experienced, as opposed to lusting over it or desiring it like wanderlust. You are seeking freedom and self-discovery, but not a particular home.  (via dietcrackcocaine)

(Source: wordsnquotes.com, via theunreadlibrarian)